Oilfield Glossary
Oilfield Glossary
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Searched for "mud weight" in Term Name (4 result(s) found)

kill-weight mud

1. n. [Drilling Fluids]
mud with density high enough to produce a hydrostatic pressure at the point of influx in a wellbore that is sufficient to shut off flow into the well. Kill-weight mud, when needed, must be available quickly to avoid loss of control of the well or a blowout. Thus, it is usually made by weighting up some of the mud (link to ID 2107) in the system or in storage by adding barite or hematite. Unless diluted in advance, the mud may become too thick and perhaps un-pumpable due to high solids loading. A weight-up pilot test can identify if and how much dilution will be needed in advance of adding weighting material to the mud in the pits.

mud weight

1. n. [Drilling Fluids]
The mass per unit volume of a drilling fluid, synonymous with mud density. Weight is reported in lbm/gal (also known as ppg), kg/m3 or g/cm3 (also called specific gravity or SG), lb/ft3 or in hydrostatic gradient, lb/in2/ft (psi/ft) or pptf (psi/1000 ft). Mud weight controls hydrostatic pressure in a wellbore and prevents unwanted flow into the well. The weight of the mud also prevents collapse of casing and the openhole. Excessive mud weight can cause lost circulation by propagating, and then filling, fractures in the rock. Mud weight (density) test procedures using a mud balance have been standardized and published by the API.
Synonyms: mud density

unweighted mud

1. n. [Drilling Fluids]
A mud that contains no commercial weighting material. Native-solids muds are unweighted muds, containing no barite. More solids-control techniques are available for unweighted muds than for weighted muds. In fact, dilution of unweighted muds is highly economical.
Synonyms: native-solids mud
Antonyms: weighted mud

weighted mud

1. n. [Drilling Fluids]
A mud that contains commercial weighting material such as barite or hematite. The economic difference in weighted and unweighted muds is the cost of replacing weighting material according to the solids control practices used. Solids control techniques, such as dilution or hydrocycloning, that can be economical in unweighted muds are not necessarily economical for weighted muds, although centrifugation (incorrectly called "barite recovery") is typically performed when using weighted muds to control mud viscosity.
Antonyms: unweighted mud